•  Previous
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3(current)
  • 4
  • 5
  • ...
  • 23
  • Next 
Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The Amazing Musical Compositions Thread
#21
Don't forget about Unfinished Battle.




[Image: Ra0aehe.png?1]
#22
(06-18-2013, 01:52 PM)markyjoe1990 Wrote:



This is Dancing with the Moonlit Knight.

Forgive me while I freak out for a second.... *long breath*
WHOLLY FRUBBLY KABAMMLES!! Mark! Astounding! Genesis (1970-77) is my favorite band bar none! I live and breath Prog Rock. I have the Genesis Boxset 1970-75 and the Genesis Archive 1967-75! Live recordings! Bootlegs! Wow! Markyjoe posted early Genesis! My day has been made! Unbelievable!--aaaannndd one of Genesis' finest! Arguably their best album, too, but it (Selling England) isn't far ahead of Foxtrot and The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway--they're blisteringly good albums also. Woooow. I can't get over this. Every muscle in my body tingles with incredulous excitement. Check out a band called Marillion. They are similar to Genesis in a lot of ways, especially in that their early music (1983-87) is better than their later pop-ish music. The climax to this song is utterly crushing:
http://youtu.be/gaBjdLQ0LJ0

(06-18-2013, 01:52 PM)markyjoe1990 Wrote: ... And how about that sexy guitar solo, eh?
That would be Steve Hackett on guitar. He is credited as the first electric guitarist to use "two-handed tapping" as can be heard in the Moonlit Knight solo. As you can imagine, I have all Hackett albums from 1975 to 2009, studio and live. For more sexiness, check out Hackett's Everyday on the Spectral Mornings album (1979). After you get past the singing, everything just skyrockets.
http://youtu.be/AHWJMnmHuis

The most amazing musical composition I know of, one I always look up to and aspire to play is none other than Karn Evil 9:


#23
(07-07-2013, 03:11 AM)Perilous Wrote: Forgive me while I freak out for a second.... *long breath*
WHOLLY FRUBBLY KABAMMLES!! Mark! Astounding! Genesis (1970-77) is my favorite band bar none! I live and breath Prog Rock. I have the Genesis Boxset 1970-75 and the Genesis Archive 1967-75! Live recordings! Bootlegs! Wow! Markyjoe posted early Genesis! My day has been made! Unbelievable!--aaaannndd one of Genesis' finest! Arguably their best album, too, but it (Selling England) isn't far ahead of Foxtrot and The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway--they're blisteringly good albums also. Woooow. I can't get over this. Every muscle in my body tingles with incredulous excitement.
...They're my favorite band too.

I wasn't expecting someone else here to really know the early Genesis, or even be attracted to progressive rock much considering it's such an old genre, and every fan of mine that I know is a young whippersnapper *raises cane*, but there we go.

Judging by your reaction, I'm going to make a few assumptions.

1) You are a big fan of mine.
2) Seeing someone mention early Genesis at all would be exciting for you.
3) The fact that 1 and 2 combine in this situation must be overwhelmingly exciting for you. I mean, what are the odds?

I feel like I need to say more to this... but I'm honestly kind of overwhelmed too. I guess this makes me happy knowing I made someone feel such intense excitement.

Okay, well. I think I should add a bit more than that.

My father was a huge fan of early genesis. My mom, a fan of later genesis. I grew up listening to "We Can't Dance", with bits of "Invisible Touch" and "Genesis". Also some Phil Collins solo stuff. When I got older, I learned about early Genesis and kind of didn't bother listening to them. I didn't start getting into albums until just a year or so ago actually. My first album was "Bat out of Hell", which made me realize that I absolutely love theatrical rock music. I got "Bat out of Hell II: Back Into Hell" and a few other Meatloaf albums.

My dad took notice that my interest in albums had increased, so he took this opportunity to recommend a lot of stuff he likes based on my tastes. Among them was "The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway". He also played for me "Supper's Ready" on his phone, and told me it was a song about some medieval knights going through a forest, partaking in a battle, celebrating, getting dragged into hell, then somehow getting back out. I didn't get it. But anyway, back to "The Lamb".

He HAD the album, but only the first half. He didn't know where he put the second half and told me "Ehhh, don't worry. The second half isn't as good anyway", but I refused to listen to it unless he had the whole thing. Since I didn't want to have to wait for him to find it, I went and bought the stereo mixed version of the album on Amazon (The Stereo Mix is what you have in your 1970-1975 set, by the way).

My initial reaction was confused. The music sounded WAAAAY different than what I was used to, but it was fascinating. I was especially in WTF mode with "Back in NYC". That chorus was one of the most alien things I ever heard at the time. But I listened to the album regardless as I worked on my fire emblem hack, Fire Mumblem.

A few songs actually sounded familiar to me though. "The Grand Parade of Lifeless Packaging" and "The Carpet Crawlers" especially gave me the feeling that I had heard it before. It was such a weird feeling, but holy shit was it cool.

After a while, I started to be able to distinguish the tracks and it kind of dawned on me that I had listened to the album well over 10 times. Each listen was exciting and interesting BECAUSE of how unique the music sounded. I felt like I had covered completely new ground and expanded my mind tremendously after listening to it so many times.

I think after that, I decided I wanted to try another early Genesis album, so I looked up their discography online. But then the best thing happened; I checked our family's CD collection and found "Foxtrot" and "Selling England by the Pound", both in perfect condition. I ripped them onto my computer.

I listened to Foxtrot and... hooooly shit. The beginning of "Watcher of the Skies" was chilling. The rest of the song was hard to parse for me except for the ending, but after enough listens, I grew to appreciate the whole piece. Fun fact: My dad attended a Beatles tribute band live show, and they played the beginning of "Watcher of the Skies" with an ACTUAL room-sized organ. He was completely blown away by it.

I also grew to appreciate "Supper's Ready" a lot more than when my dad showed it to me. It's probably my favorite song on the album.

After enough listens to Foxtrox, I gave "Selling England by the Pound" a shot. I hate that I keep using this word over and over again, but "Dancing with the Moonlit Knight" completely blew me away on the first listen. The whole song, not a specific part, but the whole thing. Also, Hackett's guitar solo immediately made me think "Pokemon!?"

After that, I got Nursery Cryme, which I originally didn't plan to buy because of the mixed reviews I read. But then I heard "Fountain of Salmacis". The keyboard at the beginning really caught me, and I figured I could give the rest of the album a try.

The Musical Box didn't impress me initially. I think that's because I misunderstood it. After enough listens, I decided it was one of my favorite songs, period. I listen to it all the time.

Even though this is generally regarded as the weakest of the "Classic Line up" Genesis, I tend to listen to it more than Foxtrox or Selling England by the Pound. No idea why. Maybe it's just cause I've listened to "Foxtrox" and "Selling England By The Pound" so much already, and I still haven't reached that point with "Nursery Cryme".

I don't have Trespass, and I've been eyeing the 1970-1975 box set for a while, but... *sigh* I want to wait until I have more money. ;-;

(07-07-2013, 03:11 AM)Perilous Wrote: Check out a band called Marillion. They are similar to Genesis in a lot of ways, especially in that their early music (1983-87) is better than their later pop-ish music. The climax to this song is utterly crushing:
http://youtu.be/gaBjdLQ0LJ0
I'll probably have to listen to their stuff and give it a bunch of listens. One thing I've learned about progressive rock is that you have to listen to it multiple times to truly appreciate it.

(07-07-2013, 03:11 AM)Perilous Wrote:
(06-18-2013, 01:52 PM)markyjoe1990 Wrote: ... And how about that sexy guitar solo, eh?
That would be Steve Hackett on guitar. He is credited as the first electric guitarist to use "two-handed tapping" as can be heard in the Moonlit Knight solo. As you can imagine, I have all Hackett albums from 1975 to 2009, studio and live. For more sexiness, check out Hackett's Everyday on the Spectral Mornings album (1979). After you get past the singing, everything just skyrockets.
http://youtu.be/AHWJMnmHuis
I happen to know about Steve Hackett's "Finger Tapping" technique, since I'm... kind of obsessed with Genesis as you just witnessed, and I look up a lot of stuff on them, from live recordings, to some of the solo careers of the dudes, etc.. He was a huge contrast to other progressive guitar players in that unlike them, he wasn't flashy or show-offy. He literally would just sit down and look at his guitar in complete concentration as he played. It's kind of endearing. Shows he really cared about the music instead of indulging.

(07-07-2013, 03:11 AM)Perilous Wrote: The most amazing musical composition I know of, one I always look up to and aspire to play is none other than Karn Evil 9:


Maybe it's cause I haven't listened to this enough, but I wasn't really able to get into it. Kind of weird considering I really like "Supper's Ready" from Genesis, which goes on for 23 minutes.

Speaking of which, I was actually gonna reference "Supper's Ready" in one of my commentaries by singing the first few seconds, but replacing the lyrics with "Walking across my sleeping room, I turn the emulator on."
#24
(07-05-2013, 05:51 AM)Onryou236 Wrote: Yeah, I know, it's a remix, and probably not the best thing to open my first post on this thread with. I happen to find it really soothing, though, from the quiet buildup at the beginning, to the simmering down at the end. I particularly like the part starting from 3:00 and ending at 4:55 for some reason.

A track from the Merlin playlist has just been added to the thread.

My life is complete.

... Well, not really. Now we must add some from the other playlists, or it will not be complete!

So... yeah. This is easily my favorite rendition of Dream Battle, the awesome Reimu theme from Imperishable Night. It's almost beaten by the version done by xi-on in 2nd Spell... almost being the key word here, but those vocals are entrancing.



This sig will Self-Destruct in 3.... 2.... 1.... Thank you for your time. Cookie?

[Image: Thunders-Sig-1.png]

Img by Ajax

[Image: B4sgQC]

#25
(07-07-2013, 01:08 PM)markyjoe1990 Wrote: ...They're my favorite band too.

I wasn't expecting someone else here to really know the early Genesis, or even be attracted to progressive rock much considering it's such an old genre, and every fan of mine that I know is a young whippersnapper *raises cane*, but there we go.

Judging by your reaction, I'm going to make a few assumptions.

1) You are a big fan of mine.
2) Seeing someone mention early Genesis at all would be exciting for you.
3) The fact that 1 and 2 combine in this situation must be overwhelmingly exciting for you. I mean, what are the odds?

...But anyway, back to "The Lamb".

I also grew to appreciate "Supper's Ready" a lot more than when my dad showed it to me. It's probably my favorite song on the album.

I don't have Trespass, and I've been eyeing the 1970-1975 box set for a while, but... *sigh* I want to wait until I have more money. ;-;

(07-07-2013, 03:11 AM)Perilous Wrote: The most amazing musical composition I know of, one I always look up to and aspire to play is none other than Karn Evil 9
Maybe it's cause I haven't listened to this enough, but I wasn't really able to get into it. Kind of weird considering I really like "Supper's Ready" from Genesis, which goes on for 23 minutes.
Wow! Your favorite band? Another thrilling surprise!
Gee whiz, the genre of prog isn't getting any younger.
(I myself am 21, young at heart, and son of a gun.)

1) I am a fan of yours for sure, and even more so now. I envy your ability to talk and provide good commentary as you play, which is something I struggle with--and it's a pity, too, because I need to start reviewing fan-made Commander Keen (old DOS game) mods.
2) Correct
3) Doubly correct.

There's always been a sharp line between early Genesis fans and later Genesis fans. Personally I can't stand "Invisible Touch" and "Follow me, follow you." I almost have a disgusted disposition toward Phil Collins, blaming him for the commercial direction Genesis would take in the later years, but ya can't put all the blame on him. In fact, in the face of all the good Phil has done, I can't hold anything against him. Nursery Cryme, Foxtrot, Selling England, Lamb Lies Down -- even Trick of the Tail and Wind and Wuthering are excellent albums.
Collins is one of the best drummers I've ever heard (next to Neil Part, Bill Brudford and Carl Palmer). Genesis usually worked with weird time signatures but Phil never missed a beat, always dynamic, always pushing it. On top of that, he supplied great backing vocals. The last album with Steve Hackett is called "Seconds Out" (a live album) with Phil on the vocals preforming many of the classic Genesis songs. They even play Supper's Ready. Seriously, Phil Collins sings Supper's Ready? Respect. He does an amazing job in place of Gabriel. I can't say enough about it. Despite the pop music Genesis would produce in the 80's and 90's, Phil Collins is the best thing that ever happened to Genesis.

My little prog story
Back in April of 2009, my brother, who was living in Texas at the time,
sent a CD to me as a gift. It was Close to the Edge by Yes, released 1972. It made no sense to me. But there was a soft, quiet, tender part in the middle of the song (Close to the Edge, the first track out of the three) that kept me listening to it. I grew up on Motown, Jazz and Classical music. Your basic Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Dean Martin, Roy Orbison, Four Tops, Supremes, and other 60's bands (unfortunately no Beatles). I knew nothing about how songs could make the mind run wild or about virtuoso musicians, guys who really go after mastering the instrument and giving a 102% performance. All the music I was exposed to was tame.
So when this mysterious, highly imaginative, meandering, music was introduced to me, I didn't understand or like it at all. But there were always little moments that always beckoned me to return and listen again. Eventually I could stomach the whole Close to the Edge album. I needed to find out more about prog. I went to Yahoo Answers of all places and asked what the best progressive rock songs are.
Someone posted Supper's Ready, this very video:
http://youtu.be/xtHClRu1DrE
I kept listening to the first 6 minutes over and over again, not able to get beyond that point. December of 2009 saw my Texan brother come home to Califorina. To surprise him, I played the opening chord sequence of Supper's Ready on the piano. He was quite surprised! Then I became deathly ill with the flu days later. My brothers party-ed it up big time, mostly playing games on the LAN. NHL Hockey, Warcraft, Starcraft, Age of Wonders, etc.. They were in need of another computer so this brother of mine (I have 8 brothers) asked if he could borrow my laptop.
At that time I had it password protected. So in order to get the password from me he offered to burn a few prog albums onto my computer. Good deal! This was December 19th. The albums he have me were Nursery Cryme, Court of the Crimson King (by King Crimson, 1969)
and Farewell to Kings (by Rush, 1977).
From then on I was hooked. I listened to those albums over and over again every day for hours upon hours.
The Musical Box and The Return of the Giant Hogweed were harsh at first, but the pay off was such a delicious experience that I became practically addicted to Nursery Cryme, the Musical Box in particular.
Musical Box and Fountain of Salmacis really take the cake, but Seven Stones is a great track, too. I was disappointed when the band didn't
talk about Seven Stones in the interviews found on the 1970-75 boxset DVDs.

Court of the Crimson King is a great album. "21st Century Schizoid Man" and the experimental section of "Moonchild" is a miss for me, but the rest of the album is majestic, and one of the earliest prog albums ever made. King Crimson is hit & miss with me, mostly miss. But their debut album is like lightning in a bottle.

In Farewell to Kings, "Closer To the Heart"
is an outstanding track. I'm not a die-hard Rush fan, but their 2112 album (1976) is undeniably one of the greatest ever. I have the privilege
of seeing Rush live in Anaheim earlier this year. Geddy Lee is the bassist and vocalist. His bass skills are top-notch and vocals are high-pitched and even tenacious. Either you love it or ya hate it. Since 1980, Geddy's voice doesn't have that bite to it, which is a shame, but nothing lasts forever. I've seen numerous fans rant and rave about Rush saying that everyone needs to listen to them and go to a live show. You might think, "Wow, Rush must be really good. I'll google them and see what comes up." So you watch the first video that comes up and youtube and it's a concert from the 90's or 2000's and there's three old guys, one of them with dark circle glasses, a large nose and long dark hair wailing like a dying cow. And you think, "What the heck did I waste my time on this for? Rush sucks!" And..well.. Rush kind of does suck. As soon as Geddy Lee's voice drops and loses its fire, it's all over. The real Rush--the powerhouse trio of awesomeness Rush--starts in 1975, Fly By Night. But it's not until 1976, in their breakthrough, all-or-nothing album 2112 that Rush catches fire and soars among the top prog bands in history. I recommend 2112 without reserve. Also the excellent Moving Pictures (1981).
The End
So, yeah. It's been an adventure discovering Progressive Rock for the past 3 and half years.

My top 5 are bands are:
Genesis
Pink Floyd (Listened to Animals 1977 today. Everytime I listen to it, I want to say it's their best one.)
Marillion (They have 3 great albums: Script for a Jester's Tear, Misplaced Childhood, Clutching at Straws)
Yes (Like Emerson,Lake&Palmer, their albums are inconsistent, but they have a great body of work that includes everyone's favorite Roundabout)
Camel (Many consider them 'elevator prog' but they're not. Their first 5 albums from 1973 to 1977 are outstanding.)

The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway is especially dear to my heart.
Back in my college days, I flicked on The Lamb everyday--every time
I got back to my dorm room from class. I was so depressed, unhappy and nervous at college. It was cloudy all the time and I had mood swings that would make Six Flags look like a merry-go-round. The Lamb was like Priscilla the Troubadour casting Mend on my poor broken body, healing my wounds I received from brigand professors and assassin teachers. I eventually dropped out of college. Now I just hang around at home,
working at the local restaurant, amassing large amounts of paper money.
I'm going to agree with your father and say the first half of The Lamb
is better than the second. The opening track? Fly on a Windshield,
In The Cage, and Carpet Crawlers? Blisteringly good. But the second half... It knocks my socks off, too. It includes the all-out rocking "Lilywhite Lilith", the unusual "Lamia" with its amazing guitar outro,
the chaotic Colony of Slippermen... it's unbelievable. I don't think the world had ever seen anything like The Lamb. It was an elaborate rock opera complete with costumes, lights, slideshow backdrops, and even a flare thrown in the center of the stage during Back in NYC. (You probably know all about this.) This was years before Pink Floyd's The Wall.
True The Lamb has weak points like "Ravine" and "Silent Sorrow in Empty Boats" but that's only when looking at it from an album perspective.
When you take into account that this entire thing was built around a stage play, it makes more sense to have long, slow sections.
Take The Colony of Slippermen for instance. It's one of the most entertaining track of the whole bloody thing, but the opening to that song is all weird and twangy. Why even include it? Get on with the music! Well, Peter Gabriel, as outrageously bizarre as he is, needs time to get on the Slipperman costume, crawl under the stage and force is way out of a giant bubble that looks like jelly. There's a tribute band called The Musical Box that recreates the whole show exactly how it was in 1975. The singer is no Peter Gabriel, but
it's definitely worth a watch to see how the show really looked those many years ago:
http://youtu.be/OlX4moDYEmA
"Back in NYC" is one that grew on me. It took time and many listens to
get to like it, especially with Peter screaming the lyrics.
The lyrics is what I enjoy most about it. Rael's gonna light you up and burn you down!!!

I'm with you on Watcher of the skies. It's a masterpiece, but I usually (and shamefully) skip right to Time Table. My second favorite song of all time has to be Supper's Ready. It embodies everything I like most about prog. Exploring, the beauty of simplicity (flute solos), the brilliance of complexity, the bizarreness (Willow Farm), the build up of tension (Apocalypse in 9/8) and the pay off/climax (As Sure As Eggs Is Eggs).
I would have to say "Can-Utility and the Coastliners" is the second best song on Froxtrot. It's a little like a mini-version of Supper's Ready. Beautiful, tension, climax. It ends a little abruptly perhaps.

Definitely pick up Trespass. Looking for Someone is a strong opener and the way it flows into White Mountain sends chills up my spine. White Mountain is a favorite. It's about a traitor wolf called Fang (son of Great Fang) who has broken the law of the wolfpack, is hunted down
and slain by One-Eye, the hero wolf. God, that song is good. Tony Banks is up to his usual tricks on organ and John Mayhew's percussion pretty good. Anthony Phillips, co-founding member, guitarist and good friend of Peter and Tony, is similar to Steve Hackett in a way. His more prominent moments are on the last track, "The Knife".
The whole album is quiet and folksy, with the exception of "The Knife", which has a WTF moment. I think you'll enjoy it. Dude, I would be more than willing to purchase the boxset and have it sent to you.

A word on "Karn Evil 9". On the album, Brain Salad Surgery (1973) "Karn Evil 9" is separated in 4 subsequent tracks:

1. Jerusalem (2:44)
2. Toccata (7:23)
3. Still... You Turn Me On (2:53)
4. Benny The Bouncer (2:21)
5. Karn Evil 9 (1st Impression - Part 1) (8:44)
6. Karn Evil 9 (1st Impression - Part 2) (4:47)
7. Karn Evil 9 (2nd Impression) (7:07)
8. Karn Evil 9 (3rd Impression) (9:03)

If you want to get into Karn Evil 9, it may be best to chew and digest one "Impression " at a time. The 2nd Impression is the most experimental and complex. I think it best to just stick with the 1st Impression Part 1 & 2 for a while. The pay off is the military, earth-shattering 3rd Impression. Robots vs. Man... Technology vs. Mankind. The final scene unfolds with the arrogant, bloody-thirsty captain of the starship and the ominous Bridge Computer. The dialogue between the two is so chillingly prophetic, it's just...auwwggghhstiquope. Technology may well be mankind's undoing.
This theme, however, only appears in the 3rd Impression. Emerson, Lake & Palmer is very much keyboard dominated, which appeals to me being a keyboard player myself. Many people who are more geared toward guitar oriented music don't like ELP.

While I'm at it, here's my list of the greatest 20-minute grand epics of prog:
1. Supper's Ready (22:58) Genesis
2. Karn Evil 9 (29:41) ELP
3. Close To The Edge (18:50) Yes
4. 2112 (20:34) Rush
5. Thick As A Brick (43:44) Jethro Tull
6. Echoes (23:27) Pink Floyd
7. Nine feet underground (22:40) Caravan
8. Tarkus (20:43) ELP
9. Hamburger Concerto (20:19) Focus
10. Grendel (19:08) Marillion

EDIT: Dayum. Sorry for such giant posts.
#26
(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: Wow! Your favorite band? Another thrilling surprise!
Gee whiz, the genre of prog isn't getting any younger.
(I myself am 21, young at heart, and son of a gun.)
I'm 23. =X

(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: 1) I am a fan of yours for sure, and even more so now. I envy your ability to talk and provide good commentary as you play, which is something I struggle with--and it's a pity, too, because I need to start reviewing fan-made Commander Keen (old DOS game) mods.
2) Correct
3) Doubly correct.
I like watching people play fan-made levels/hacks. What's your channel link? Maybe I can give some feedback.

Being good at commentary is a matter of confidence. You gotta get comfortable with it and develop tactics that help you figure out what to talk about. Either that or write a script, or prepare stuff to talk about beforehand. I sometimes do both, but most of my commentary is improvised.

Alternatively, do post-production commentary. You won't have to talk and play at the same time.

(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: There's always been a sharp line between early Genesis fans and later Genesis fans. Personally I can't stand "Invisible Touch" and "Follow me, follow you." I almost have a disgusted disposition toward Phil Collins, blaming him for the commercial direction Genesis would take in the later years, but ya can't put all the blame on him. In fact, in the face of all the good Phil has done, I can't hold anything against him. Nursery Cryme, Foxtrot, Selling England, Lamb Lies Down -- even Trick of the Tail and Wind and Wuthering are excellent albums.
Collins is one of the best drummers I've ever heard (next to Neil Part, Bill Brudford and Carl Palmer). Genesis usually worked with weird time signatures but Phil never missed a beat, always dynamic, always pushing it. On top of that, he supplied great backing vocals. The last album with Steve Hackett is called "Seconds Out" (a live album) with Phil on the vocals preforming many of the classic Genesis songs. They even play Supper's Ready. Seriously, Phil Collins sings Supper's Ready? Respect. He does an amazing job in place of Gabriel. I can't say enough about it. Despite the pop music Genesis would produce in the 80's and 90's, Phil Collins is the best thing that ever happened to Genesis.
I like Invisible Touch and Genesis, and feel they only have a few weak tracks each. We Can't Dance on the other hand has, like, only 5 good songs on it (No Son of Mine, I Can't Dance, Jesus He Knows Me, Driving the Last Spike, and Dreaming while you Sleep). I don't mind the pop era of Genesis, but there's no doubt that the band was far more creative, eclectic, and focused in their early days, and their later music is far less challenging.

I also don't feel it's Phil's fault that the band became pop oriented. The band was already leaning towards pop by The Lamb. Some of the best songs on the album have the verse-chorus structure (The Carpet Crawlers and The Grand Parade of Lifeless Packaging being the most explicit examples). I think that, even if Peter Gabriel stayed in the band, they would have eventually transformed regardless. Take note, Peter Gabriel wasn't their leader. The band functioned as a democracy, and they wrote their songs by combining each other's ideas. For example, Steve Hacket probably wrote his own guitar solos, and then when the band found a good spot in a song to put it, that's what they did.

(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: So, yeah. It's been an adventure discovering Progressive Rock for the past 3 and half years.

My top 5 are bands are:
Genesis
Pink Floyd (Listened to Animals 1977 today. Everytime I listen to it, I want to say it's their best one.)
Marillion (They have 3 great albums: Script for a Jester's Tear, Misplaced Childhood, Clutching at Straws)
Yes (Like Emerson,Lake&Palmer, their albums are inconsistent, but they have a great body of work that includes everyone's favorite Roundabout)
Camel (Many consider them 'elevator prog' but they're not. Their first 5 albums from 1973 to 1977 are outstanding.)
Of the ones you mentioned, I only have albums from Genesis and Pink Floyd. With Pink Floyd, I only have "The Wall", though I have listened to "Animals" and "Dark side of the Moon". x.x

I have a feeling that I'd like the band more if their writing wasn't so hate-filled and bitter. In albums like "Dark Side of the Moon", their writing feels balanced out by really good music. But albums like "Animals" are so jaded and hate-filled, with absolutely no light shining through that it feels too depressing/upsetting to be satisfying. Not to mention the music didn't seem as inspired or memorable. Granted, I've only listened to it once, so maybe I'm just being too quick to judge. Even then though, I had trouble sitting through it, which isn't usually a problem with me.

I think "The Wall" is alright. I kind of feel the main character is unsympathetic, but the story is easier to follow than "The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway", which I only recently came up with an interpretation for. I also think the album does a good job making it's story feel intense at parts. But uh... yeah, the album isn't really consistent from a musical quality stand point. Lots of filler tracks that only serve to add to the story, or flat out repetitive/boring tracks like "Waiting for the Worms".

I personally think "Dark Side of the Moon" is their best album out of the ones I've heard. it's really good at painting a dark, sinister world, both with lyrics and the music. And the music itself feels more memorable and more inviting than "Animals".

(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway is especially dear to my heart.
Back in my college days, I flicked on The Lamb everyday--every time
I got back to my dorm room from class. I was so depressed, unhappy and nervous at college. It was cloudy all the time and I had mood swings that would make Six Flags look like a merry-go-round. The Lamb was like Priscilla the Troubadour casting Mend on my poor broken body, healing my wounds I received from brigand professors and assassin teachers. I eventually dropped out of college. Now I just hang around at home, working at the local restaurant, amassing large amounts of paper money.
Prolly make more money than me. ;-;
I've had four jobs. My fourth job, which I'm still working at, is being a cashier at a dollar store. >_<'

I guess being a youtube partner helps, but I don't make that much money with that. Just enough to help me pay my college loans.

(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: I'm going to agree with your father and say the first half of The Lamb
is better than the second. The opening track? Fly on a Windshield,
In The Cage, and Carpet Crawlers? Blisteringly good. But the second half... It knocks my socks off, too. It includes the all-out rocking "Lilywhite Lilith", the unusual "Lamia" with its amazing guitar outro,
the chaotic Colony of Slippermen... it's unbelievable. I don't think the world had ever seen anything like The Lamb. It was an elaborate rock opera complete with costumes, lights, slideshow backdrops, and even a flare thrown in the center of the stage during Back in NYC. (You probably know all about this.) This was years before Pink Floyd's The Wall.
True The Lamb has weak points like "Ravine" and "Silent Sorrow in Empty Boats" but that's only when looking at it from an album perspective.
When you take into account that this entire thing was built around a stage play, it makes more sense to have long, slow sections.
Rock Operas were around before the 70's. I think The Who made one called "Tommy".

(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: Take The Colony of Slippermen for instance. It's one of the most entertaining track of the whole bloody thing, but the opening to that song is all weird and twangy. Why even include it? Get on with the music! Well, Peter Gabriel, as outrageously bizarre as he is, needs time to get on the Slipperman costume, crawl under the stage and force is way out of a giant bubble that looks like jelly. There's a tribute band called The Musical Box that recreates the whole show exactly how it was in 1975. The singer is no Peter Gabriel, but
it's definitely worth a watch to see how the show really looked those many years ago:
http://youtu.be/OlX4moDYEmA
I think they shoulda just left the filler tracks out from the studio version, and just played those tracks in their live performances. I don't see the benefit in including them.

(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: "Back in NYC" is one that grew on me. It took time and many listens to
get to ljke it, especially with Peter screaming the lyrics.
The lyrics is what I enjoy most about it. Rael's gonna light you up and burn you down!!!
"But it was miiiine in the first place, so I burn it to ash!"

Rael was quite the motherfucker back in new york city.

(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: I'm with you on Watcher of the skies. It's a masterpiece, but I usually (and shamefully) skip right to Time Table.
I find it weird how a lot of reviews say Time Table is the weakest track on the album, yet a lot of people seem to like it a lot. Sometimes it's even their favorite track. =\

(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: My second favorite song of all time has to be Supper's Ready. It embodies everything I like most about prog. Exploring, the beauty of simplicity (flute solos), the brilliance of complexity, the bizarreness (Willow Farm), the build up of tension (Apocalypse in 9/8) and the pay off/climax (As Sure As Eggs Is Eggs).
I would have to say "Can-Utility and the Coastliners" is the second best song on Froxtrot. It's a little like a mini-version of Supper's Ready. Beautiful, tension, climax. It ends a little abruptly perhaps.
The song feels awkward near it's climax. It feels like it's trying too hard to sound cheery right after the dark instrumental section it had before.

(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: Definitely pick up Trespass. Looking for Someone is a strong opener and the way it flows into White Mountain sends chills up my spine. White Mountain is a favorite. It's about a traitor wolf called Fang (son of Great Fang) who has broken the law of the wolfpack, is hunted down
and slain by One-Eye, the hero wolf. God, that song is good. Tony Banks is up to his usual tricks on organ and John Mayhew's percussion pretty good. Anthony Phillips, co-founding member, guitarist and good friend of Peter and Tony, is similar to Steve Hackett in a way. His more prominent moments are on the last track, "The Knife".
The whole album is quiet and folksy, with the exception of "The Knife", which has a WTF moment. I think you'll enjoy it. Dude, I would be more than willing to purchase the boxset and have it sent to you.
My dad has told me that "The Knife" is the only good track on the album, but he's probably wrong, knowing my personal tastes.

I appreciate the offer, but... I'd feel really bad taking someone else's money for free. It's one of the reasons I don't make a big deal out of my paypal donation thingy on my website.

Though, if you have the set, you could probably rip it onto your computer. That'd be free, but at the same time, I kind of want to show my support by paying for the set.

(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: A word on "Karn Evil 9". On the album, Brain Salad Surgery (1973) "Karn Evil 9" is separated in 4 subsequent tracks:

1. Jerusalem (2:44)
2. Toccata (7:23)
3. Still... You Turn Me On (2:53)
4. Benny The Bouncer (2:21)
5. Karn Evil 9 (1st Impression - Part 1) (8:44)
6. Karn Evil 9 (1st Impression - Part 2) (4:47)
7. Karn Evil 9 (2nd Impression) (7:07)
8. Karn Evil 9 (3rd Impression) (9:03)

If you want to get into Karn Evil 9, it may be best to chew and digest one "Impression " at a time. The 2nd Impression is the most experimental and complex. I think it best to just stick with the 1st Impression Part 1 & 2 for a while. The pay off is the military, earth-shattering 3rd Impression. Robots vs. Man... Technology vs. Mankind. The final scene unfolds with the arrogant, bloody-thirsty captain of the starship and the ominous Bridge Computer. The dialogue between the two is so chillingly prophetic, it's just...auwwggghhstiquope. Technology may well be mankind's undoing.
This theme, however, only appears in the 3rd Impression. Emerson, Lake & Palmer is very much keyboard dominated, which appeals to me being a keyboard player myself. Many people who are more geared toward guitar oriented music don't like ELP.
I have a feeling the keyboarding was what turned me off. There's so much of it.

(07-08-2013, 05:18 AM)Perilous Wrote: While I'm at it, here's my list of the greatest 20-minute grand epics of prog:
1. Supper's Ready (22:58) Genesis
2. Karn Evil 9 (29:41) ELP
3. Close To The Edge (18:50) Yes
4. 2112 (20:34) Rush
5. Thick As A Brick (43:44) Jethro Tull
6. Echoes (23:27) Pink Floyd
7. Nine feet underground (22:40) Caravan
8. Tarkus (20:43) ELP
9. Hamburger Concerto (20:19) Focus
10. Grendel (19:08) Marillion

EDIT: Dayum. Sorry for such giant posts.
Isn't Thick As A Brick pretty much the entire album? Like. The entire album is just one enormous song. It's kind of crazy actually.
#27
This song, my friends, is what I call CLIMATIC.
In-game, out of it, remixed, arranged...the essence of this song is purely magnificent in any form.

Here I present you:

Cannon Ball - Megaman Zero 3 Soundtrack





Cannon Ball Hard Revenge - Megaman ZX Soundtrack





Cannon Ball - Rockman Zero Mythos



[Image: Ra0aehe.png?1]
#28
Maybe I'm just a weirdo, but I always felt that Cannon Ball, while one of the better tracks throughout the Rockman Zero series, was also one of the most overrated.

Don't forget about Falling Down





Needless to say (because it's also a little overrated), Departure is also pretty good, although I prefer the Mythos version over the original.




And now for a couple underrated themes... What made these two for me was not necessarily the music in itself, but what it was applied to.

Both of Elpizo's battle themes

Oddly enough, I happened to stumble upon a hyper extended mix of both the original and a remastering looking for the first part. I don't mind this mix, because it takes some of the better qualities of the original and the remastered. (first loop starts around 2:55, I think)




And now for his second theme... It's the remastered version.




Either way, his second theme just ain't the same without him screaming in anger/pain/whatever.

Anyway, I would like to close this post up with a question...

What would be the easiest way to get into the Moody Blues? I can enjoy listening to them with my mom, but I have trouble getting into them on my own.
#29
Exclamation 
Wow, people have been posting alot here. Never really noticed. Well I guess I should just post something here then.





I have no idea why I'm posting Christmas songs in the middle of July but that's just a habit of mine because I miss Christmas so much during the summer. Often when I hear any version of We Wish You A Merry Christmas it's either with a loud choir or a loud orchestra. This is just a trumpet with some quiet instrumental music in the background. It just feels a lot more magical of not having a choir screaming in your ear the entire time. It's just... magical. A JOLLY GOOD EARLY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE!





Man if it's one instrument that is underrated as all hell it's the panflute. I even bought one to start playing it myself a couple of years ago but I never got good enough sound through the pipes to make it sound good. But I'm just surprised about how many people never heard panflute music before. It just sounds so much more natural to me then a normal flute, which is a reason why I love this track so much.





MAKO!!!! WHY DID YOU HAVE TO DIE???? WHY???? :'(
But seriously, If you in any way like good and simple covers go check out this girl's channel. She has made some great stuff.
#30
And now for something that's more of a guilty pleasure and indulgence.





So recently I've been watching SAO and this song has kinda grown on me. It's nothing tooooo special. I'd dare say it's a bit generic and not at all something to drool over, but I have to admit it's a guilty pleasure of mine and I find myself playing this on repeat for hours on end.

I love both the original Japanese version of this song and the cover done by the amazing Amanda Lee, but I just found myself posting this version.

So... yeah.
This sig will Self-Destruct in 3.... 2.... 1.... Thank you for your time. Cookie?

[Image: Thunders-Sig-1.png]

Img by Ajax

[Image: B4sgQC]

  
  •  Previous
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3(current)
  • 4
  • 5
  • ...
  • 23
  • Next 


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)